Michael Kors arnotts
Uncategorized / May 3, 2017

A tradition of sexism”I’ve often said,” says Cobb, “about Michelle Obama that people do not have a language to discuss her.”Some of the chatter about the first lady’s arms inadvertently summons the Sapphire stereotype (named after a female character on the “The Amos ‘n’ Andy Show,” which began as a radio show in 1928 before becoming a controversial television program) that defines black women as emasculating and angry, and further suggests that her muscular arms aren’t quite feminine. In a recent New York Times column about the first lady’s arms, Maureen Dowd writes, “It is Michelle who looks as though she could easily wind up and punch out Rush Limbaugh, Bernie Madoff, and all the corporate creeps who ripped off America.” Beyond playing on racial stereotypes, the focus on Obama’s fashion choices also reflects a sexism that has long been in existence, says Anthony. Despite Clinton’s prestigious law degree and her effort to create health policy when her husband was president, the media often focused on her hair and clothes. Kennedy and Pat Nixon were the first first ladies to graduate from college, says Anthony. But when their husbands battled for the presidency, all the media talked about was how…